Secret Of MANUKA HONEY AND CROHN'S DISEASE

Secret Of MANUKA HONEY AND CROHN'S DISEASE

Being one of the most dreadful, painful and difficult digestive problems to treat, Crohn’s disease is a growing problem all over the world. Often times, Crohn’s disease is being confused as ulcerative colitis, bowel syndrome and gastric ulcer. If you are one of those who has Crohn's disease, you may find yourself in a situation of despair when in search for treatment options. This is due to the fact that the causative agents of Crohn’s disease have been a mystery to the world of modern science.
 
Manuka honey is a special kind of honey, which honey bees made by using the nectar from wild Manuka trees related to Leptospermum species. These Manuka trees are native to New Zealand and Australia. Manuka honey has many special properties that are absent in other honey. It is this special Manuka factor of Manuka honey, which generates the interest of many scientists. Is Honey good for treating IBD Now Manuka honey is the most widely studied form of honey for its various medicinal uses.
 
The normal medical dilution of hydrogen peroxide (3%) kills bugs but also damages the surrounding tissue. The hydrogen peroxide in honey, released gradually as it comes into contact with the body fluids, is present at a much lower concentration - enough to kill the bugs, but not damage tissue. Manuka honey and Crohn's disease The problem about using honey as a wound dressing is that it is extraordinarily messy - and that, from a medical point of view, it is very difficult to keep it in contact with the wound. However, Professor Peter Molan of the Honey Research Unit at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, has been working on the problem. Professor Molan is as enthusiastic about the anti-inflammatory properties of honey as about its antibiotic properties, although he
 
admits, sadly, that there are very few clinical trials supporting its anti-inflammatory use.   
 
messy - and that, from a medical point of view, it is very difficult to keep it in contact with the wound. However, Professor Peter Molan of the Honey Research Unit at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, has been working on the problem. Professor Molan is as enthusiastic about the anti-inflammatory properties of honey as about its antibiotic properties, although he
 
admits, sadly, that there are very few clinical trials supporting its anti-inflammatory use.   
messy - and that, from a medical point of view, it is very difficult to keep it in contact with the wound. However, Professor Peter Molan of the Honey Research Unit at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, has been working on the problem. Professor Molan is as enthusiastic about the anti-inflammatory properties of honey as about its antibiotic properties, although he
 
admits, sadly, that there are very few clinical trials supporting its anti-inflammatory use.   
 
messy - and that, from a medical point of view, it is very difficult to keep it in contact with the wound. However, Professor Peter Molan of the Honey Research Unit at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, has been working on the problem. Professor Molan is as enthusiastic about the anti-inflammatory properties of honey as about its antibiotic properties, although he
 
admits, sadly, that there are very few clinical trials supporting its anti-inflammatory use.   
 
messy - and that, from a medical point of view, it is very difficult to keep it in contact with the wound. However, Professor Peter Molan of the Honey Research Unit at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, has been working on the problem. Professor Molan is as enthusiastic about the anti-inflammatory properties of honey as about its antibiotic properties, although he
 
admits, sadly, that there are very few clinical trials supporting its anti-inflammatory use.   
 
 
 
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